Famous People on the Web

A CLEVER SLAVE

Who Was Famous

Biographical Dictionary of the Famous and Those Who Wanted to Be

Edited by Irwin L. Gordon

Fifty Famous People

A BOOK OF SHORT STORIES

BY JAMES BALDWIN

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Famous Women

Who Was Famous
Famous People

Famous People
Abbreviations

Famous People
Obituaries

Famous People
Biographies A

Famous People
Biographies B

Famous People
Biographies C

Famous People
Biographies D

Famous People
Biographies E

Famous People
Biographies F

Famous People
Biographies G

Famous People
Biographies H

Famous People
Biographies I

Famous People
Biographies J

Famous People
Biographies K

Famous People
Biographies L

Famous People
Biographies M

Famous People
Biographies N

Famous People
Biographies O

Famous People
Biographies P

Famous People
Biographies Q

Famous People
Biographies R

Famous People
Biographies S

Famous People
Biographies T

Famous People
Biographies U

Famous People
Biographies V

Famous People
Biographies W

Famous People
Biographies X

Famous People
Biographies Y

Famous People
Biographies Z

Famous Women

Famous Women Contents

Famous Women - HARRIET BEECHER STOWE

Famous Women - HELEN HUNT JACKSON

Famous Women - LUCRETIA MOTT

Famous Women - MARY A LIVERMORE

Famous Women - MARGARET FULLER OSSOLI

Famous Women - MARIA MITCHELL



A CLEVER SLAVE

A long time ago there lived a poor slave whose name was Aesop.
[Footnote: Aesop (_pro_. e'sop).] He was a small man with a large
head and long arms. His face was white, but very homely. His large
eyes were bright and snappy.

When Aesop was about twenty years old his master lost a great deal of
money and was obliged to sell his slaves. To do this, he had to take
them to a large city where there was a slave market.

The city was far away, and the slaves must walk the whole distance.
A number of bundles were made up for them to carry. Some of these
bundles contained the things they would need on the road; some
contained clothing; and some contained goods which the master would
sell in the city.

"Choose your bundles, boys," said the master. "There is one for each
of you."

Aesop at once chose the largest one. The other slaves laughed and said
he was foolish. But he threw it upon his shoulders and seemed well
satisfied. The next day, the laugh was the other way. For the bundle
which he had chosen had contained the food for the whole party. After
all had eaten three meals from it, it was very much lighter. And before
the end of the journey Aesop had nothing to carry, while the other
slaves were groaning under their heavy loads.

"Aesop is a wise fellow," said his master. "The man who buys him must
pay a high price."

A very rich man, whose name was Xanthus, [Footnote: Xanthus (_pro_.
zan'thus).] came to the slave market to buy a servant. As the slaves
stood before him he asked each one to tell what kind of work he could
do. All were eager to be bought by Xanthus because they knew he would
be a kind master. So each one boasted of his skill in doing some sort
of labor. One was a fine gardener; another could take care of horses; a
third was a good cook; a fourth could manage a household.

"And what can you do, Aesop?" asked Xanthus.

"Nothing," he answered.

"Nothing? How is that?"

"Because, since these other slaves do everything, there is nothing
left for me to perform," said Aesop.

This answer pleased the rich man so well that he bought Aesop at once,
and took him to his home on the island of Samos.

In Samos the little slave soon became known for his wisdom and courage.
He often amused his master and his master's friends by telling droll
fables about birds and beasts that could talk. They saw that all these
fables taught some great truth, and they wondered how Aesop could have
thought of them.

Many other stories are told of this wonderful slave. His master was
so much pleased with him that he gave him his freedom. Many great men
were glad to call him their friend, and even kings asked his advice
and were amused by his fables.

Beatrix Potter - Peter Rabbit

FIFTY FAMOUS PEOPLE

FIFTY FAMOUS PEOPLE - CONTENTS

SAVING THE BIRDS

ANOTHER BIRD STORY

SPEAKING A PIECE

WRITING A COMPOSITION

THE WHISTLE

THE ETTRICK SHEPHERD

THE CALIPH AND THE POET

BECOS! BECOS! BECOS!

A LESSON IN HUMILITY

THE MIDNIGHT RIDE (OF PAUL REVERE)

THE BOY AND THE WOLF

ANOTHER WOLF STORY

THE HORSESHOE NAILS

THE LANDLORD'S MISTAKE

A LESSON IN MANNERS

GOING TO SEA

THE SHEPHERD-BOY PAINTER

TWO GREAT PAINTERS

THE KING AND THE BEES

OUR FIRST GREAT PAINTER

THE YOUNG SCOUT

THE LAD WHO RODE SIDESADDLE

THE WHISPERERS

HOW A PRINCE LEARNED TO READ

READ AND YOU WILL KNOW

THE YOUNG CUPBEARER

THE SONS OF THE CALIPH

THE BOY AND THE ROBBERS

A LESSON IN JUSTICE

THE GENERAL AND THE FOX

THE BOMB

A STORY OF OLD ROME

SAVED BY A DOLPHIN

LITTLE BROTHERS OF THE AIR

A CLEVER SLAVE

ONE OF AESOP'S FABLES

THE DARK DAY

THE SURLY GUEST

THE STORY OF A GREAT STORY

THE KING AND THE PAGE

THE HUNTED KING

TRY, TRY AGAIN!

WHY HE CARRIED THE TURKEY

THE PADDLE-WHEEL BOAT

THE CALIPH AND THE GARDENER

THE COWHERD WHO BECAME A POET

THE LOVER OF MEN

THE CHARCOAL MAN AND THE KING

WHICH WAS THE KING?

THE GOLDEN TRIPOD

NAMES OF FAMOUS PEOPLE

Famous Women - LOUISA M ALCOTT

Famous Women - MARY LYON

Famous Women - HARRIET G HOSMER

Famous Women - MADAME DE STAEL

Famous Women - ROSA BONHEUR

Famous Women - ELIZABETH BARRETT BROWNING

Famous Women - GEORGE ELIOT

Famous Women - ELIZABETH FRY

Famous Women - ELIZABETH THOMPSON BUTLER

Famous Women - FLORENCE NIGHTINGALE

Famous Women - LADY BRASSEY

Famous Women - BARONESS BURDETT-COUTTS

Famous Women - JEAN INGELOW

Phoenix Arizona

Jessica Simpson

Famous Quotes

Famous Quotes

World Famous Recipes . Famous Quotes

Chicken Recipes . Chicken Recipes . Chicken Recipes . Funny Quotes